Olive trees and sangliers

Every winter I have a modest crop of olives, mainly on the three more mature trees.  This winter, they yielded much less, but surprisingly some of the 20 plus trees planted three years ago have started to produce a tiny crop.

In the past I have invited Jacky to pick my olives and add them to his.  This year, Odile and a friend picked them.  The olives all go to the press in Aulas, restored a few years ago by Jacky and some friends.

Last week Jacky called by with a present of a bottle of the new olive oil.  I was very touched, particularly as he did not get my olives this time.  I will open the bottle shortly and compare its taste with the commercial ones.

 

 

 

Jacky and I then reviewed the extensive upheaval caused by the nightly rampages of the sangliers (wild boars).

Plants round pool gone
Ground round olive trees churned over

 

 

 

 

Every terrace is affected, every olive tree has earth dug up round it, and many of the plants surrounding the pool will need replacing,

Jacky and Marthe leave today for their annual Asian walking holiday, this time in Thailand.  When he returns there is no choice but to instal an electric fence (posts with two or three cables) surrounding the terraces with the olive trees and the pool – with ‘gates’ to allow us access between the two houses, the pool and the children’s cabin below it.

Jacky says I am not the first to react with dismay at this idea – not just because of the cost, but visually and mentally fencing in is not what we would like to have.  But with the growing numbers of sangliers invading these valleys, there is no alternative.

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